WATCH

See the moment a snake catcher nabs 1.9 metre eastern brown snake

A massive eastern brown, the second most deadly snake in the world, was captured at Beaudesert, in south-east Queensland on Wednesday.

Snake catchers Tony and Brooke Harrison from Gold Coast and Brisbane Snake Catchers said the 1.9 metre creature was one of the largest they had seen.

"We had the call out to catch the snake, which was next to a shed," Ms Harrison said.

"As we got there. We saw another, smaller snake go underneath the shed.

"We went across the road to Red Rooster and told the homeowner to let us know if it came out again.

"As we were leaving, they shouted out to us to say it had reappeared."

RECORD CATCH: The 1.9 metre snake was the largest Brooke Harrison has ever captured. Photo: Supplied

RECORD CATCH: The 1.9 metre snake was the largest Brooke Harrison has ever captured. Photo: Supplied

Ms Harrison said there were more snakes around during mating season and warned people not to get near any seen in and around properties.

"If you see one, keep your distance," she said.

"Call a snake catcher and if possible take a photo so we can see what you're dealing with.

"A lot of species come in shades of brown and eastern browns are not always brown."

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Ms Harrison said there were a lot of snakes in Beaudesert and while the brown was not a personal record, her partner had captured even bigger specimens.

Eastern browns can grow past 2 metres and broadscale agricultural clearing has been a boon.

The Australian Museum says their numbers have grown thanks to the ready supply of rodents that follow clearing.

Brooke Harrison with the 1.9m brown snake. Photo: Supplied

Brooke Harrison with the 1.9m brown snake. Photo: Supplied

Browns can be confused with other species as colours range from almost black to any shade of brown so the rule is to keep away from all snakes.

They range from north Queensland to South Australia, thriving in in some of the most populated parts of the country. A nervy species, they will strike quickly when disturbed.

Predators include birds of prey and feral cats and large numbers are killed on roads.

Although fatalities from snake bite is low in Australia, eastern browns cause more deaths than any other species. Many bites occur when people try to kill them.

Wearing long pants, thick socks and boots greatly reduces the risk of being envenomated because eastern browns have relatively small fangs.

This story See the moment a snake catcher nabs whopper of an eastern brown first appeared on Beaudesert Times.