Mayor Darren Power and Jordan MP Charis Mullen oversee Cedar Grove Environmental Centre treatment plant going online

Turning it on: Jordan MP Charis Mullen and Logan mayor Darren Power with councillor Teresa Lane at the Cedar Grove treatment plant.
Turning it on: Jordan MP Charis Mullen and Logan mayor Darren Power with councillor Teresa Lane at the Cedar Grove treatment plant.

A Queensland-first sustainable wastewater treatment plant at Cedar Grove is now operational, with Logan mayor Darren Power visiting see it go online yesterday.

The first flow through the $53.7 million Cedar Grove Environmental Centre is the culmination of two years' construction and a decade of planning.

Unlike conventional wastewater treatment plants, the CGEC benefits the Logan River and its catchment through record low levels of nutrients in reclaimed water, and catchment restoration projects.

CGEC is also an environmental reserve for the community and a centre for research.

Community and environmental uses occupy 95 per cent of the 204-hectare site.

The site includes seven hectares of wetlands, 120,000 native trees and shrubs, some of Logan's oldest recorded Queensland blue gum trees and more than 20 bird species.

Logan City Council mayor Darren Power said the CGEC operated under the strictest environmental licence ever granted by the Queensland's Department of Environment and Science.

Turning it on: Counillor Teresa Lane and mayor Darren Power oversee the Cedar Grove wastewater treatment plant going online.

Turning it on: Counillor Teresa Lane and mayor Darren Power oversee the Cedar Grove wastewater treatment plant going online.

"This is cutting-edge infrastructure that the city can be proud of," Cr Power said.

"It will cater for Logan's population growth and ensure the environment is looked after, too.

"It's also hoped that the adjacent wetlands and revegetated areas on site will be a drawcard for our native species."

Logan City Council and the state government's land use planning and property development unit, Economic Development Queensland, worked together to fund and deliver the project.

City Infrastructure Committee chair Teresa Lane said a community reference group was formed to ensure decisions were made in line with community expectations.

"Council worked hard to ensure the community had a say in developing the overall master plan for the site," Cr Lane said.

"It's essential that the community feels a sense of ownership over big projects like this and that has been achieved.

"The site includes features requested by the community reference group, including walking trails and shelters along the river."

Residents initially opposed the location of the plant in 2017 after learning it would be built in their area.

They met with Cr Trevina Schwarz to get it moved.

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