Champion Ekka exhibitor falls fowl of bitumen bandits who cost him $9000

Angry: Tony Stallwood has been left disappointed by road work at his property. Photo: Matt McLennan

Angry: Tony Stallwood has been left disappointed by road work at his property. Photo: Matt McLennan

A multiple Ekka champion exhibitor has issued a warning to his neighbours after he says he was conned by bitumen bandits who did a poor job laying a new driveway at his property.

Tony Stallwood, 84, and his wife Sue say they paid more than $9000 for the work, but were left disappointed by the standard after the men finished.

His calls come in the wake of reports of bandits striking at Boonah and Logan.

The Office of Fair Trading warned that with people home due to COVID-19, shady tradies were ramping up operations.

Men turned up at Mr Stallwood's Buccan property on May 18, offering to lay a new driveway with left over materials from another job.

"There had been three or four similar types of sales pitches, but I had always buggered them off," he said.

Mr Stallwood, who has won 13 best waterfowl titles at the annual show with muscovy ducks, eventually agreed to let the men do the work, but said he was not happy with the job.

"I don't mind paying for a job, but don't have a go at me.

I don't mind paying for a job, but don't have a go at me.

Tony Stallwood

"I have worked hard for my money over the years."

He said he expected a thicker base, and the job did not go to the edge of his original driveway.

"They have just laid it on top," he said.

"It does not even go to the edge of the existing road base."

Other areas were not filled in correctly, and pooling water would still be an issue.

"When we get rain, the water will lay there," Mr Stallwood said.

He urged people not to let the men undertake the work.

"People need to know. I have heard of them hitting other places around here too," he said.

The OFT said help was at hand for anyone who fell victim to the tradies.

Under the Australian Consumer Law. consumers have extra rights if they receive unsolicited approaches by traders at their homes.

Door-to-door traders must advise consumers about a 10-day cooling-off period, and they must not accept payment or begin any services during this time.

"Some door-to-door traders take advantage of the fact that people find it hard to say no or to tell traders to leave, and they pressure consumers into buying goods or services that they may not want or need. It's OK to say no," Mr Bauer said.

Consumers can lodge a complaint against a trader at qld.gov.au/fairtrading or by calling 13 74 68.