Good Friday Appeal gets taxpayer boost

The face of the Good Friday Appeal Quinnie Westwood posing for a photograph with CFA volunteers.
The face of the Good Friday Appeal Quinnie Westwood posing for a photograph with CFA volunteers.

The annual Good Friday Appeal for the Royal Children's Hospital has raised $18.2 million after the Victorian government threw it a lifeline.

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews announced on Friday his government would make up the shortfall between what was raised this year and last year's total, which was $18 million.

The final total raised was $18.2 million, organisers said.

"The total is something all Victorians should be proud of, especially under such trying circumstances," Good Friday Appeal executive director Anne Randall said in the statement late on Friday.

"It is incredible to see the community continuing to rally together - virtually - and raise funds for children in need."

The appeal relied this year on a "virtual tin shake" in place of volunteers in public collecting in-person donations.

Earlier on Friday evening Mr Andrews said the state could not watch the appeal fall short this year.

"The Good Friday Appeal supports the neediest kids - kids that are sick - and their families, every year, and we can't leave the kids short this year," he told Channel 7.

At 8pm on Friday the donation tally was at nearly $7.2 million.

Donations help the hospital care for children like Quinnie Westwood, the face of this year's campaign.

Quinnie was born unable to breathe and had kidney failure, before undergoing surgery at age two to get her grandfather's kidney.

The youngster is now six years old and despite the challenges faced since birth, including having to take anti-rejection medication, she makes her parents proud of how far she has come.

As well as patient care, donations go towards equipment, technology, research and training.

This year marks the 150th year for the Royal Children's Hospital.

Australian Associated Press