Grievous assault and weapons crimes are on the up in Logan and Beaudesert

Rising: Weapons crimes in Logan and Beaudesert are on the up, according to a state government report.
Rising: Weapons crimes in Logan and Beaudesert are on the up, according to a state government report.

Assault and weapons offences rose in Logan and Beaudesert last year, according to a state government crime report, and Logan's new mayor fears worse is to come.

The report suggests that repeat offenders are on the rise across Queensland, with more crimes committed by fewer criminals.

Grievous assault in Logan and Beaudesert was up by 55.4 per cent in 2018-19, with 114 reported. There were 72 in 2017-18.

Serious assault, excluding grievous, was up by 21 per cent, from 186 cases in 2017-18 to 231 last year.

Common assault was down two per cent.

There was a sharp rise in Weapons Act offences, up 20 per cent, and a 12 per cent increase in unlawful use of a motor vehicle.

More shop break-ins were reported in 2018-19. Unlawful entry with intent (shop) was up by 17 per cent.

Unlawful entry to homes was up by eight per cent, and Logan mayor Darren Power fears coronavirus could make the situation worse.

"I'm expecting a big jump next year as the financial crisis from the coronavirus hits," Mr Power said.

There will be a lot of social issues caused by the financial crisis."

Darren Power

He said domestic violence cases could rise as people were forced inside to isolate and alcohol sales rose.

"The amount of alcohol people are buying, just because they have to do something," Mr Power said.

"Cabin fever causes issues.

"It's a deadly mix.

"Mental health is going to be a huge issue. I'm calling on the government to get some experts to address it, particularly if we have a total lockdown."

He also implored residents to consider their security arrangements.

"We are going to have to be vigilant, especially with our own property," Mr Power said.

"Install security cameras and get good locks. If you don't have those, you could be a target.

"We can't expect Queensland police to fix all the problems. There will be a lot of social issues caused by the financial crisis."

Police minister Mark Ryan said the state-wide trend was positive.

"It's the third year in a row we've seen a decline in the number of offenders, and the lowest number of offenders in 10 years," he said.

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