Cedar Grove wetlands provide habitat for increasing wildlife populations

LOGAN City Council has revealed increasing wildlife populations are flocking to the recently developed wetlands on the site of the almost complete Cedar Grove sewage treatment plant.

PRIME HABITAT: Frogs and birds have been spotted in the Cedar Grove wetlands recently.

PRIME HABITAT: Frogs and birds have been spotted in the Cedar Grove wetlands recently.

Construction of the plant is 70 per cent complete with the facility expected to operate by the middle of next year.

The council's roads and water infrastructure acting director Daryl Ross said the environmental benefits of the wetlands was an important aspect of the project.

"The wetlands will polish the highly treated water from the site's wastewater treatment plant," Mr Ross said.

"They will also provide a habitat for local wildlife.

"It has been great to see some birds and frogs in the wetlands as they become more established.

"Enriching the surrounding environment has been a priority from the start of the project."

More than 50,000 native trees and shrubs have been planted at the site Logan City Council have named as the Cedar Grove Environmental Centre.

About 37,000 of these were planted to offset landclearing by developers in Logan.

Mr Ross said the Cedar Grove Environmental Centre was the largest vegetation offset site in the city.

"It's quite impressive to see this many plants across such a large area by the Logan River," he said.

Work has been done in partnership with Healthy Land and Water to rehabilitate sections of the Logan River banks.

This is expected to prevent 5775 tonnes of sediment from entering the waterway annually.

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