Anglers hook mixed bag in estuaries | On the Water with Dave Downie

SOLID: Randy Keeble pictured with a solid threadfin from the Brisbane River.
SOLID: Randy Keeble pictured with a solid threadfin from the Brisbane River.

Estuaries' catches are still dominated by flathead and whiting, however, there have been a few other species mixed in over the past few weeks including chopper tailor, trevally and the occasional estuary cod and mangrove jack.

Pick of locations for mangrove jack and estuary cod over the past week has been the Nerang River and northern Gold Coast rivers, creeks and marinas.

Trevally has been a consistent catch in the Southport Seaway for those drifting with live herring over the submerged pipeline as the tide slows for the turn. The run-in tide has been the most productive for this technique.

There has also been a lot of trevally caught in the early evenings by trolling the rock walls, marinas and around bridges.

It's traditionally the end of the tailor season, however, we're still seeing good catches around the Pin Bar on both North and South Stradbroke Islands, on the Sunshine Coast from the Noosa River mouth to Double Island Point and on Fraser Island.

Moreton Bay is turning up a few school mackerel around the shipping beacons and at the northern end of the Rainbow Channel.

The Bay island shallows, around six to 10 metres, has produced pan size snapper but you really need to be there either before daylight or after dark in the early evening.

Daytime catches have been pretty ordinary. Sand crabs catches have been good in the deeper water.

CATCH: Michael Gibson with a mulloway caught on the eastern beach, Moreton Island.

CATCH: Michael Gibson with a mulloway caught on the eastern beach, Moreton Island.

Spread your pots over a variety of depths to find where the best numbers are then when you do start catching crabs, move all your pots to the same area and a similar depth.

There have been good catches on the western edge of the Rainbow Channel, deeper water east of Mud Island and in the deeper Channels on the northern side of the Brisbane River mouth.

Offshore fishing is still being dominated by snapper and for those float lining, some good quality. There has also been solid spangled emperor in close to headlands like Point Lookout or Cape Moreton. Live bait has produced big cobia as well as amberjack and kingfish to eight kilograms.