Coffee, groceries, hardware on menu as Wing gets approvals for drone delivery

TAKE FLIGHT: Wing Australian head of operation Terrance Bouldin-Johnson, Extraction Artisan Coffee owner Alex Milosevic and Wing chief executive James Ryan Burgess.
TAKE FLIGHT: Wing Australian head of operation Terrance Bouldin-Johnson, Extraction Artisan Coffee owner Alex Milosevic and Wing chief executive James Ryan Burgess.

ROAST chicken, coffee and hardware supplies are on the menu for Logan residents during the early days of drone delivery.

They will be among the first residents in Queensland to receive airborne deliveries, with Alphabet Inc subsidiary Wing to begin flying to homes in Crestmead and Marsden in the coming weeks.

It comes after the company received approvals from the Civil Aviation Safety Authority, as well a development approval from Logan City Council for modifications to its Berrinba delivery facility.

The drones are capable of delivering items up to 1.5 kilograms to homes within 10 kilometres. Using the Wing app, customers will be able to order coffee from Extraction Artisan Coffee, groceries like eggs, milk and hot roasted chickens from Friendly Grocer Crestmead and hardware items from Browns Plains Hardware.

Wing chief executive James Ryan Burgess said Logan had been chosen as a rapidly-growing region.

"(We look for places) where there's hustle and bustle and people can save time not sitting in traffic," he said.

"There's a diversity of demographics from parents with young children to people working multiple shifts and only having a short period for healthy meals."

Development Minister Cameron Dick said the company could generate millions for the local economy and reduce traffic.

Concerns about the system previously raised by residents included privacy, noise, safety, security and vandalism of the drones.

Mr Burgess said in Canberra - where Wing has operated for more than a year - the company had been able to engage with the community to address these issues.

"We were able to...redesign the propellers and we've made the sound a lot lower," he said.

After an order is placed, a drone navigation system will plot a route between the distribution centre and the customer. After it arrives, it will lower the package via tether while hovering about seven metres above the ground.

Mr Burgess said the drones could fly at about 120 kilometres an hour.

Some businesses will set up stock and equipment at the Berrinba distribution centre.

This week, Wing is holding flight demonstrations for community members. For more information, visit wing.com/communityinfologan.