Skilling Queenslanders for Work trainees rejuvenate Jimboomba, Logan Village parks

ENVIRONMENTAL rehabilitation of Jimboomba and Logan Village parks is going ahead under the state government funded Skilling Queenslanders for Work project.

ON THE JOB: Skilling Queenslanders for Work Yarrabilba trainee Emmanuel Tettey removed weeds at Kooruhman Park at Logan Village.

ON THE JOB: Skilling Queenslanders for Work Yarrabilba trainee Emmanuel Tettey removed weeds at Kooruhman Park at Logan Village.

Twelve trainees will plant 1000 native trees in Kurrajong Park at Jimboomba and Kooruhman Park at Logan Village under the supervision of Logan City Council staff and Reclink Australia.

The trainees are also working to re-grow the endangered swamp tea-tree Melaleuca irbyana and perform weed control and mulching tasks.

Another group of 10 trainees have started restoring habitats to promote the recovery of the Richmond Birdwing butterfly in areas including Windaroo Creek, Belivah Creek and California Creek at Cornubia.

The six month paid program provides accredited training and support to people who have struggled to obtain qualifications, skills and work experience.

Program supervisor Ashleigh-Jo Dawson said it was an opportunity for trainees to reset their job prospects.

"It's about getting them back into the workforce, exposing them to an industry, and getting them job ready," she said.

Trainee Abigail Tavukuin said she was learning valuable information on the job.

"I enjoy protecting and preserving the ecosystem, researching about different species and especially physical work helps keep me fit and healthy," she said.

Council's Parks Branch trainee Wayne Roney said the traineeship was a fresh start in a new career.

"I enjoy learning new things and meeting new people who are like minded," he said.

Skilling Queenslanders for Work graduates receive a Certificate I in conservation and land management.