Jimboomba mother defends 'down to earth' brain surgeon Charlie Teo

A JIMBOOMBA mother has defended high profile Sydney neurosurgeon Charlie Teo who performed life changing surgery on her daughter.

RECOVERY: Cassandra and Charli Berghauser at the Jimboomba Thunder Rugby League Grounds ahead of Charli's surgery with Dr Teo in February this year. Photo: Jacob Wilson

RECOVERY: Cassandra and Charli Berghauser at the Jimboomba Thunder Rugby League Grounds ahead of Charli's surgery with Dr Teo in February this year. Photo: Jacob Wilson

Dr Teo has been under pressure over recent weeks following attacks from sections of the medical profession over the fees charged for complex brain surgery.

Professor of Surgery at the University of Sydney Henry Woo said it was "disturbing" to see over 100 Go Fund Me campaigns seeking to raise up to $120,000 for life-saving surgery with Dr Teo over several years.

Dr Teo has defended the prices and under that scenario $80,000 would go to the private hospital and $40,000 was shared between him and his team, leaving him with $8000.

Jimboomba mother Cassandra Berghauser had to launch her own Go Fund Me campaign to raise $100,000 in five months to cover surgery costs for her daughter Charli Berghauser, who was diagnosed with a pineal cystic tumor.

With the condition, Charli had to quit school and rugby league and suffered severe headaches and blurry vision.

Dr Teo performed the successful surgery on Charli in February this year and her symptoms have gone.

Ms Berghauser said if Dr Teo was not available she would have had no choice but to travel to Houston, USA, and pay at least $140,000

"What he has dealt with over the past few weeks is basically bullying," she said.

"I feel for the man. He is better than most surgeons and for the medical profession to treat him the way they are is madness.

"He is very down to earth and straight to the point. He told us everything we wanted to know, both good and bad, and left the decision up to us. He said Charli would be the best candidate for this operation, the choice was ours to make, not his."

Ms Berghauser said she would have preferred to have the surgery done through the public system, but that was not an option.

"The only way that would happen is if neurosurgeons invite him...why they won't is something I really don't understand," she said.

"He could teach so many more neurosurgeons with his techniques."

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