Council votes to approve sewage treatment plant

LOGAN City Councillors voted to approve a sewage treatment plant site to service 172,000 residents living in Yarrabilba, Logan Village, Chambers Flat, Logan Reserve and Park Ridge.

SITE DECISION: Logan City Council has voted in favour of a sewage treatment plant site to service Yarrabilba, Chambers Flat, Logan Reserve and Park Ridge residents. Photo: Unity Water

SITE DECISION: Logan City Council has voted in favour of a sewage treatment plant site to service Yarrabilba, Chambers Flat, Logan Reserve and Park Ridge residents. Photo: Unity Water

The council will reveal 100 to 200 acre site, located along the Logan River, following negotiation with relevant land owners.

Cr Pidgeon said the council was seeking to reach a voluntary agreement with property owners and did not support forced resumption of land.

Economic Development Queensland will fund the $50 million plant which will have a maximum capacity of 12 megalitres of wastewater per day.

It must be built by 2021 to ease pressure on the Loganholme site which is close to capacity.

Yarrabilba will contribute 45 per cent of the effluent water and Logan Village will be responsible for six per cent.

The remainder will come from Chambers Flat, Logan Reserve and Park Ridge.

Councillors Phil Pidgeon, Laurie Koranski, Darren Power and Lisa Bradley voted to oppose council's preferred site.

Water committee chairman Cr Phil Pidgeon said he supported a different site but would carry out the council decision.

"I believe another site had more merit but I have a role as the chairman of the committee to do the best job we can for the community

"I will do it as fairly as possible to ensure people in the area are consulted and involved."

Cr Pidgeon said the council was seeking to reach a voluntary agreement with property owners and did not support forced resumption of land.

Effluent discharge will go into the river but there could be opportunities for agricultural businesses to fund pipelines for farmers to use treated effluent for crop irrigation.

Cr Pidgeon said council was required to produce a net positive environmental income for every litre which goes into the river.

"The effluent is almost indistinguishable from drinking water. There is no odour," he said.

Community feedback during a six week consultation period informed 40 per cent of council's decision with 30 per cent consideration towards the environment and 30 per cent weighting given to the financial side of the project.

A community reference group will be set up to have input into the buffer zone which is expected to to be about 100 acres of public space.

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