Logan City Council to decide outcome of application for service station near Woodhill State School

CONCERNED: Logan Country Safe City group member and Woodhill resident Monica Hambleton is worried about a proposed development for a petrol station on the Mount Lindesay Highway. Photo: Jacob Wilson.
CONCERNED: Logan Country Safe City group member and Woodhill resident Monica Hambleton is worried about a proposed development for a petrol station on the Mount Lindesay Highway. Photo: Jacob Wilson.

Logan City Council will decide the fate of a controversial development application for a service station next to Woodhill State School by April 26.

State Member for Scenic Rim, Jon Krause, had been calling on the state government to act to improve safety issues caused by traffic congestion at the school as it considered the development application.

But a Logan City Council spokesman said public notification was completed on February 15 and the traffic impacts of the development had been assessed by council traffic engineers and the state government, which was a Concurrence Agency for the application due to the site adjoining the state controlled Mount Lindesay Highway.

"Council has received a Concurrence Agency response from the State approving the application and proposed access arrangements to the Mount Lindesay Highway subject to conditions," he said.

A Transport and Main Roads spokesman said TMR had recommended to the State Assessment and Referral Agency that a second left-turn lane and a separate right-turn lane be installed on the Mount Lindesay Highway as part of this development, but Logan City Council would make the final call on the application.

Mr Krause said there were ongoing issues with traffic congestion around the school and many parents had contacted him concerned about the proposed development.

"In both morning and afternoon peaks, especially at the end of the day, safety issues arise as cars are banked on the highway trying to access the carpark at Woodhill State School," he said.

"With cars parked on both sides of the exits, this section of the Mount Lindesay Highway becomes dangerous as parents are forced to park past the designated exit point on the south side of the school."

In a letter to the government, Mr Krause said that the issues exist at the school because there was not enough room in the 'Stop, Drop and Go' area and there was a major lack of parking for a school the size of Woodhill.

"Parents simply have no other choice than to queue on the highway to access the 'Stop, Drop and Go' zone inside the school,' he said.

Mr Krause implored Transport and Main Roads and Education Queensland to look closely at these issues because the situation during peak times was clearly dangerous, and with more development proposed nearby - with more kids, more cars, and more traffic on the highway - the situation at the school will only deteriorate.

The Transport and Main Roads spokesman said TMR understood there was increased traffic along the Mount Lindesay Highway next to Woodhill State School during school drop-off and collection times.

He said development applications were assessed based on traffic engineering and road safety requirements, so recommendations could be provided to the State Assessment and Referral Agency.

"SARA then collates recommendations from various state government departments."

He said TMR also recently attended Woodhill State School's Safe School Travel meeting to deliver road safety education materials and high visibility vests, and update loading zone signs to help parents co-ordinate vehicle movements in the school car park.

This story Council to decide development application's fate first appeared on Beaudesert Times.