Ahmadiyya Muslims pay tribute to Christchurch terror victims

THE Ahmadiyya Muslim community have vowed to defeat hatred and not bow down to the threat of terrorism.

SOLIDARITY: Members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community at the Stockleigh Baitul Masroor Mosque held a vigil ceremony on Sunday. Photo: Jacob Wilson

SOLIDARITY: Members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community at the Stockleigh Baitul Masroor Mosque held a vigil ceremony on Sunday. Photo: Jacob Wilson

Two days after the brutal massacre of at least 50 Muslims during Friday prayers at two Christchurch mosques, the Stockleigh Baitul Masroor Mosque hosted a vigil ceremony for those who lost their lives.

This came one day after a 22-year-old Browns Plains man was charged for allegedly ramming his car into front gate of the Stockleigh mosque and shouting abuse at worshipers during prayer time on Saturday afternoon.

Imam Wadood Janud said the Christchurch terror attack had a ripple effect across the Muslim community.

"It could have been our mosque...we had men and children praying here on that day. They would have been as vulnerable as our brothers who passed away in Christchurch," he said.

"Many of these people who passed away in Christchurch would have escaped violence and persecution, most of them came (to New Zealand) to get away from those things."

Imam Janud said the terrorist's mission to scare Muslims from practicing their faith had failed.

"If we stop going to the mosque it would be like bowing down to the terrorist and his violence," he said.

"That is something that will not stop us from practicing our faith freely...we have had more people coming for evening and night prayers than we normally do because people did not want to bow down to this act of terror.

"This hatred will not win. We will come together, unite and defeat extremism through love, education and awareness." 

Interfaith community leaders, police, Logan Cr Laurie Koranski and the Muslim community attended the vigil on Sunday evening to pay tribute to the fallen.

Brisbane Ahmadiyya Muslim Community director of public affairs Ibraheem Malik said people from all faiths and community groups extended their condolences to the Muslim community.

People with no prior connection to the mosque visited to present flowers and good wishes.

Imam Janud said a mother and two children drove past the mosque three times on Sunday afternoon before proceeding.

"This car pulled into the mosque and a mother with two sons came holding flowers," he said.

"When they approached I said I noticed they drove past three times. (The mother) said they were scared...there was some intimidation. They did not know how to proceed or approach.

"The 30 minutes they spent here with mutual love and shared humanity broke down barriers and built bridges.

"In even the darkest of times, hate did not win."  

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