Wildlife carers call on Mirvac to prevent wildlife road risk

CONCERNED: Wildlife carers Fiona Murray and Alma Searle want Mirvac to take preventative measures to stop kangaroos crossing Greenbank Road. Photo: Jacob Wilson
CONCERNED: Wildlife carers Fiona Murray and Alma Searle want Mirvac to take preventative measures to stop kangaroos crossing Greenbank Road. Photo: Jacob Wilson

WILDLIFE carers have called on Mirvac to do more to keep animals safe on roads surrounding the Everleigh residential development.

Greenbank resident and carer Fiona Murray said she wanted Mirvac to install a six foot fence from Greenbank Road to Teviot Road.

Ms Murray said there had been an increase in kangaroo deaths on Greenbank Road, Crowson Lane and Teviot Road during a short time this year.

“Mirvac are just expecting them to go out the back where they have a wildlife conservation area,” she said.

Wildlife carer Alma Searle said developers should donate money to wildlife carers who work long hours to rescue injured animals.

“Wildlife carers are the ones who have the sleepless nights,” Ms Searle said.

“We run around, use petrol and feed them.”

“If we can’t be the voice for wildlife they will not survive.

“They can’t talk like humans and say ‘take me to the hospital I’m dying on the road’.”

Ms Searle said she was called to look after a kangaroo which was struck on Greenbank Road on Tuesday, August 7, about 3.20pm.

The kangaroo was euthanised due to severe leg injuries.

Mirvac released a statement to reveal Australia Wide Environmental Consultants director Joel Keady had been contracted to manage wildlife issues. 

Mr Keady defended the Mirvac’s conservation approach as best practice.

 Fauna spotter and catcher Joel Keady defended Mirvac's wildlife approach as best practice.

Fauna spotter and catcher Joel Keady defended Mirvac's wildlife approach as best practice.

Mr Keady is contracted by Mirvac as a fauna spotter and catcher and said his team had a three-step approach to protect wildlife.

“We have already completed the first step, which is the fauna survey, so we know what types of animals are present in the area and we have a unique management plan for each species,” Mr Keady said.

“We are working … with the construction team to determine the timing and location of construction activity, with the aim of giving animals the opportunity to move through existing wildlife corridors to other areas of their own accord.”

Mr Keady said his team would be on site at all times during the early construction phase to oversee the process and ensure animals were safe.

“If migration does not occur naturally, my team will relocate the animal and, wherever possible, the animal’s natural habitat to approved release sites that have been surveyed...”

Mirvac was contacted for further comment on measures to specifically reduce the risk of wildlife from being struck by cars on surrounding roads.

Mirvac’s Everleigh residential development is a 481 hectare site located on the corner of Greenbank and Teviot Road.

The project will be completed in stages over 16 years and will result in 3300 new homes.

Comment has been sought from Logan City Council regarding the number of injured wildlife reports on Greenbank Road this year.