Electric car recharging signals start to local clean transport solutions

CHARGE AND GO: Yarrabilba resident Jim Barbey is one of three electric vehicle owners in the community and was one of the first to try the new fast charger. Photo: Supplied
CHARGE AND GO: Yarrabilba resident Jim Barbey is one of three electric vehicle owners in the community and was one of the first to try the new fast charger. Photo: Supplied

PULLING up to recharge your electric car is no longer just a concept, it’s now a reality in the Jimboomba region.

After the opening of Flagstone Bridge by deputy premier Jackie Trad on July 7, a solar-powered car was the first vehicle to cross the bridge, inspiring questions for the deputy premier about government policy to support the growth of electric cars as a viable choice.

“One of the things that Economic Development Queensland is doing is looking at how we incorporate our electric vehicle strategy as a state government,” Ms Trad told the Times at the event.

“We have formulated a climate change strategy as well, where clean transportation, like electric vehicles, are very much part of the solution to dealing with emissions and carbon pollution.

“Economic Development Queensland, as the state government land development corporation, is looking at how we can incorporate this into developments going forward.

“We do know that with large scale developments and changing technologies that things like electric vehicles and electric vehicle charging stations are going to be a key to clean transport for the future,” Ms Trad said.

In May, 2017, a fast electric car charger was installed at Yarrabilba, making the suburb the first master-planned community in Australia to install this type of technology. 

According to a statement from Yarrabilba’s developer Lendlease, the Veefil fast charger – a technology around 25 times faster than home charging, reducing charge time down from eight hours to 30 minutes – makes it more convenient to drive an electric vehicle and is based on technology developed in Queensland.  

Lendlease general manager Guy Gibson said the Veefil is about meeting the needs of communities of the future.

“Our focus is to build sustainable communities, and fast electric vehicle chargers are the critical piece of infrastructure that provides the confidence and convenience to drivers to enable growth in the ownership of electric vehicles,” he said. 

“The intent is that this will be the first of several charging stations to be installed within Yarrabilba, with the Lendlease project team currently reviewing future locations.” 

Electric vehicles are here

Developed by Queensland-based company Tritium, Yarrabilba’s Veefil is only the sixth to be installed in Queensland.

The Veefil will initially be provided as a subsidised service, with a token required for use from Yarrabilba’s Harmony Café or the Information Centre on Darrau Avenue.  

Yarrabilba resident Jim Barbey is one of three electric vehicle owners in the community and one of the first to try the new fast charger.  

“I can sit, have a coffee for half an hour and my car will be fully charged,” he said.

“Yarrabilba will now become a hub for people travelling in electric vehicles from Brisbane, Ipswich or the Gold Coast. They can pass through Yarrabilba, top-up and have no problems getting home. 

“Australians are slowly starting to make electric cars a priority, and as more fast charge hubs become available, I think we will start to see more electric vehicles on our roads.”