Snake takes a free motorbike ride

CHAMBERS Flat resident Ken Armstrong ferries animals for a living, but a snake trying to get a free ride took him by surprise.

Mr Armstrong was on Chambers Flat Road after riding to Loganholme when a snake popped its head up near his motorcycle’s handlebars.

FOUND: A common tree snake is removed from a motorcycle at Chambers Flat. Photo: Cheryl Goodenough

FOUND: A common tree snake is removed from a motorcycle at Chambers Flat. Photo: Cheryl Goodenough

After he stopped on the side of the road, a passerby tried to coax the snake out, but it slithered into the body of the bike.

Logan Village bike mechanic Ian Pollock, of Queensland Performance Motorcycles, was called to remove parts of the bike to get to the snake.

Tanzen of South Side Snake Services retrieved the common green snake before letting it go in nearby bushes.

Tanzen removes the snake from the motorbike. Photo: Cheryl Goodenough

Tanzen removes the snake from the motorbike. Photo: Cheryl Goodenough

Mr Armstrong runs an animal taxi service and often ferries pets to and from the airport.

He mostly transports dogs and cats and said he was taken aback when he saw the snake’s head pop up close to the ignition.

Tanzen said all snakes were protected by law and only licenced catchers could remove them.

Snake catcher Tanzen, with bike mechanic Ian Pollock and Chambers Flat resident Ken Armstrong. Photo: Cheryl Goodenough

Snake catcher Tanzen, with bike mechanic Ian Pollock and Chambers Flat resident Ken Armstrong. Photo: Cheryl Goodenough

“Snakes are an important part of our ecosystem and they do have a role to play,” she said.

Tanzen said that people could help prevent snakes from getting into houses by closing up holes in screen doors.

“Never leave doors open and be careful if you have pet doors.

“In the yard look where you are putting your hands and feet as snakes can hide in the garden, piles of wood and in building materials.

“They are also active at night so make sure you use a light source,” she said.

Tanzen said parents also needed to keep a close eye on children.

“Don’t just let them reach into bush to get toys and balls and check your chook pens before children collect eggs.

“Snakes commonly hide in chook pens, as well as in nesting boxes,” she said.

Tanzen said it was best to avoid the risk of getting bitten by calling on a licensed snake catcher.

She also urged people to check up on snake first aid, in case someone was bitten.