Rally for better national broadband network services: Jimboomba resident

RALLY TOGETHER: Jimboomba resident Chris Hoare says disgruntled national broadband network customers should rally together. Photo: Cheryl Goodenough
RALLY TOGETHER: Jimboomba resident Chris Hoare says disgruntled national broadband network customers should rally together. Photo: Cheryl Goodenough

A FRUSTRATED Jimboomba resident has called on disgruntled national broadband network customers to get together to campaign for better services.

Chris Hoare said he had technicians work on the fibre-to-the-node service four times at his home before he had access to NBN.

Now connected, he found the internet speed slow and the connection dropping out intermittently.

“I am getting faster internet speeds on my mobile, even with the hassles they’ve been having with 4G in Jimboomba,” he said.

Mr Hoare said he hoped that raising the concerns would lead to Telstra improving its services.

“If the issue is in the limelight, surely it will get to a point where Telstra realise they have to do something?” he said.

“It seems like the small guy is getting walked on, while a big corporation is getting away with it.”

Mr Hoare, a machine operator, said he would apply to Telstra for $1000 compensation because someone was told to be at home on each of the four days a technician attended.

“I work an 11-hour day and get paid $341 a day,” he said.

“I am not asking for the money in cash, just a rebate on my account.

“I believe that would be a fair compromise.”

He also estimated having spent about 15 hours on the phone and had been without internet.

Mr Hoare said that after the first technician attended, Telstra said his NBN service was available.

“They said we could just plug in the modem as we were NBN-ready,” he said.

When there was no service, he contacted Telstra again.

Mr Hoare said he was told a second technician did work at the node but NBN still did not work.

The fourth technician told him the node had been fitted backwards and a second replacement modem he had been sent was found to be faulty.

Mr Hoare said his complaint and request for compensation was referred several times between a complaints resolution case manager and the billing department.

In one phone call, Mr Hoare said he was told he could not be compensated because there had been no resolution of his complaint about slow internet.

Mr Hoare said he had complained to the Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman and would consider going to the Office of Fair Trading or the Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal.

A spokesman for Telstra apologised for Mr Hoare’s poor experience.

“We have spoken to him and promised to investigate further to find a resolution to the problems he has highlighted,” the spokesman said.