Canterbury College space design team returns to earth after US trip

SPACE SETTLERS: Zac O’Reilly (2016 graduate), Kyle Cossor (year 10), Blake Roesler (year 11) and Ayden Giess (year 10) at the Kennedy Space Center. Photo: Supplied
SPACE SETTLERS: Zac O’Reilly (2016 graduate), Kyle Cossor (year 10), Blake Roesler (year 11) and Ayden Giess (year 10) at the Kennedy Space Center. Photo: Supplied

A CREW of Canterbury College students recently returned from the United States after participating in the International Space Settlement Design Competition in Titusville, Florida, where they were placed second in a global field.

The Canterbury College senior Australian space design team won the Australian national final for the third year in a row in January, which allowed the students to compete internationally.

According to a college spokesperson, the ISSDC is an industry simulation event where teams respond to a request for tender put forward by a fictional company known as the Foundation Society.

This year, the Australian students worked with students from Uruguay, the United Kingdom and the United States to form ‘Dougeldyne Astrosystems’ and ‘Flechtel Constructors’.

Within their company, the students appointed their president and worked within their departments to create a design for a settlement on Venus.

According to year 10 student Kyle Cossor, it was “pretty amazing” to represent Australia and show other nations how this country can contribute to space travel, although it was, at times, intimidating.

“It was a big room, lots of strangers,” he told the Times this week.

“It was a challenge to show my own skills and contribute to those of others. I got to meet NASA staff which was cool.”

Hostile planet

The students were required to think of creative ways to ensure their workers would be able to safely live and work on the planet.  

New to the competition, year 10 student Ayden Giess said he worked alongside participants who have attended five years in a row.

“I was in the operations group. We had to work on materials, construction processes, transport, electricity, food and water.”

Kyle, meanwhile, worked on automations and robotics.

“Once I got to know my fellow group members, we worked really well collaboratively and communicated well,” he said.

“I would definitely love a career in robotics or aeronautics, with either NASA or SpaceEx. I made some great contacts when I was there.”

The students are now working on their next Canterbury College competition entry for the qualifying round next term.

Canterbury College’s Science Open Afternoon takes place on August 16 as part of Science Week. Contact 3299 0888 for more information.