Logan Enhancement Project signs installed at entry points

SOD TURNING: Logan MP Linus Power, treasurer Curtis Pitt, Algester MP Leeanne Enoch and Transurban Queensland's Wes Ballantine. Photo: Supplied
SOD TURNING: Logan MP Linus Power, treasurer Curtis Pitt, Algester MP Leeanne Enoch and Transurban Queensland's Wes Ballantine. Photo: Supplied

PROJECT signs have been installed to let motorists know they are entering the roadworks zone for the $512 million Logan Enhancement Project.

Logan MP Linus Power said the installation of the signs was part of early works underway on the project after the sod was officially turned last month.

“Other early construction activities underway include clearing and grubbing, as well as establishing five site officers across the huge project,” Mr Power said.

The LEP consists of upgrades to the Logan and Gateway motorways, including improving the congestion hot spot at the Beadesert Road and Mount Lindesay Highway interchange at the Logan Motorway.

DESIGN: A diagram showing the underpass at the Beaudesert Road and Logan Motorway intersection. Photo: Supplied

DESIGN: A diagram showing the underpass at the Beaudesert Road and Logan Motorway intersection. Photo: Supplied

Nine project signs have been installed at the main entry points to the work site.

Algester MP Leeanne Enoch said the signs signalled changed traffic conditions, including the presence of concrete traffic barriers, workers and traffic control devices.

A free-flowing underpass for traffic turning from Beaudesert Road southbound to the Logan Motorway westbound is among the work being undertaken.

The underpass has removed the need for previously proposed traffic signals.

Traffic going northbound on the Mount Lindesay Highway will also be able to access the Logan Motorway and the Gateway Extension Motorway via a designated free-flowing ramp.

A set of traffic signals will be located where the southbound traffic on the Mount Lindesay Highwa meets the westbound service road.

Transurban Queensland group general manager Wes Ballantine said they would keep motorway lanes open during peak periods, carrying out work that required lane closures at night and on weekends.

“A lot of the work can be undertaken off the motorway and behind barriers – we really only work on the road when we absolutely have to,” he said.

“As project elements are completed, they will be opened to traffic, so benefits of the project will progressively be seen throughout the construction period.”