Tamborine residents joined by wandering bull after flood-damaged fences fail

GRAZING GUEST: The bull was one of about 20 head of cattle that wandered onto the Riemore Estate after flood damage to fences at Tamborine. Photo: Supplied
GRAZING GUEST: The bull was one of about 20 head of cattle that wandered onto the Riemore Estate after flood damage to fences at Tamborine. Photo: Supplied

A HERD of approximately 20 cattle gave Tamborine residents an even closer taste of the country than they usually experience, after flood-damaged fences allowed the stock to roam into gardens.

According to Riemore Estate resident Martin Lawrence, a large bull and a number of cows and calves moved onto the estate.

“Given that the owners had little control over the fencing due to the floods, the residents were understanding and accepted that it would take a little time to corral the animals and fence them in again,” he said.

“The bull had got into our rear garden at night, about three weeks ago, and destroyed three trees.

“The final straw was to find hoof marks and mud all over our driveway, Sunday morning last, with a young Daintree Pine tree snapped in half and three purple fountain grasses chewed down to the soil.”

Residents’ tolerance was tested until earlier this week.

“Six weeks further on and the cattle (minus the bull, who I haven't seen for about two weeks) are still brazenly wandering around the estate, defecating, eating expensive plants, damaging and breaking young trees and making lots of noise,” Mr Lawrence said.

According to Riemore Estate manager Ross Cumming, all the wayward stock have now been returned to the relevant properties and most fences have been repaired.

“I had calls from a couple of residents saying the cattle had access to the residential area of Riemore, but that’s about it.,” he said.

“It’s pretty tough to blame people about flood damage. The bull was wandering on the estate. It would have been for a couple of days. He was happily grazing there. 

“We weren’t going to be herding-up a bull, without experience,” he said.

“We have areas of Riemore that are still undeveloped, and that’s where it was. We live in an area where grazing is part of the whole fabric of the area.”